How learning and development can improve workplace confidence

We all know how important it is that the team can perform the tasks expected of them – but what more could you be achieving in your organisation?

We all know how important it is that the team can perform the tasks expected of them – but what more could you be achieving in your organisation?

Neuroplasticity in learning

Neuroplasticity is one of the most powerful tools in the armoury of any training and learning professional – but what is it, and how does it work?

Neuroplasticity is one of the most powerful tools in the armoury of any training and learning professional – but what is it, and how does it work?

How to avoid being a bossy boss

Are you a natural leader, one your team happily follow to success, or is your position maintained by constant reminders that you’re in charge? A bossy boss – one who demands they are treated with authority – is never in a position of strength. The sole focus of a bossy boss is ‘I’ – the … Continue reading “How to avoid being a bossy boss”

“Senior business leaders unequipped to manage and develop people”

[fusion_text] Those blunt words were how the CIPD announced the findings of its HR Outlook: Winter 2016-17 survey.  While organisations voted performance management and people management as the two most important behaviours and skills for organisations over the next three years, senior leaders’ current performance in these areas were considered ineffective by 53% of respondents … Continue reading ““Senior business leaders unequipped to manage and develop people””

Flexible working – the good and the bad

[fusion_text] When we ask what people desire in their careers there can be a long list of things they name – but one word that crops up time and time again is flexibility. But when that can be interpreted so many different ways – and by so many different people who influence your career – … Continue reading “Flexible working – the good and the bad”

The Neurology of Professional Performance

[This post is a synopsis of a longer article, published in Strategic HR Review, Volume 15, Issue 4, and available for purchase and download online] The challenges of today’s world make leadership approaches rooted in fixed, rigid positions not just counterproductive, but likely to lead to organisational failure: leadership must now be more adaptive and … Continue reading “The Neurology of Professional Performance”

Could uncertainty be an opportunity for L&D?

[fusion_text] Faced with the uncertainty the EU Referendum result was bound to bring, markets and currency continue to test the public’s faith in better days to come. With more questions being raised than answers given or believed, companies across both the UK and Europe unsurprisingly have hit the pause button on investment and operational decisions. … Continue reading “Could uncertainty be an opportunity for L&D?”

Change, Millennials and the Workplace

[fusion_text] The point that ‘Millennials are different’ is one that has been made many times before – and questioned on occasions too. Since 24 June and the results of the EU Referendum, however, there is a new point to be made about this age group. Millennials are angry. This doesn’t, perhaps, make them so unique. Along … Continue reading “Change, Millennials and the Workplace”

Two Way Monologues

I can see quite clearly how employees’ opinion – especially where it’s expressed confidentially to a third party – of the quality of management they receive could differ from the managers’ opinions, but the figures above suggest that the two groups have sharply different opinions about how often they meet and for how long. The survey goes on to show that they are no greater agreement about the topics they discuss when they do meet. So how come 33% of employees don’t notice the weekly meetings they have with their manager, and even the ones who do think these meetings take place seem to think they are considerably shorter than their managers are reporting?

I can see quite clearly how employees’ opinion – especially where it’s expressed confidentially to a third party – of the quality of management they receive could differ from the managers’ opinions, but the figures above suggest that the two groups have sharply different opinions about how often they meet and for how long. The survey goes on to show that they are no greater agreement about the topics they discuss when they do meet. So how come 33% of employees don’t notice the weekly meetings they have with their manager, and even the ones who do think these meetings take place seem to think they are considerably shorter than their managers are reporting?