Want proof?

Whatever your industry, learning and development are part of the process, and every employee goes through a course training at some point which is intended to progress their career. For many, though, these training courses are a box to be ticked, and little thought goes into applying that knowledge beyond the day of the course. … Continue reading “Want proof?”

Flexible working – the good and the bad

[fusion_text] When we ask what people desire in their careers there can be a long list of things they name – but one word that crops up time and time again is flexibility. But when that can be interpreted so many different ways – and by so many different people who influence your career – … Continue reading “Flexible working – the good and the bad”

Born or made: talent revisited

The ‘talent – born or made?’ debate is one of those L&D issues that resurfaces from time to time, although it’s not entirely clear in any empirical sense why this should be the case. Perhaps its longevity as an issue is something that we can chalk down to the power of belief: advocates of each side of the argument could be forgiven – or at least understood – for succumbing to the attractions of their case. One would hope, however, that those working as coaches, trainers, educators or developers might be more swayed by the ‘made’ argument. If not, there is more than a suggestion that they are denying the potential impact of their work – and potential is surely the critical word here – or tacitly abnegating responsibility.

The ‘talent – born or made?’ debate is one of those L&D issues that resurfaces from time to time, although it’s not entirely clear in any empirical sense why this should be the case. Perhaps its longevity as an issue is something that we can chalk down to the power of belief: advocates of each side of the argument could be forgiven – or at least understood – for succumbing to the attractions of their case. One would hope, however, that those working as coaches, trainers, educators or developers might be more swayed by the ‘made’ argument. If not, there is more than a suggestion that they are denying the potential impact of their work – and potential is surely the critical word here – or tacitly abnegating responsibility.