Are you really making a difference with your L&D?

With evidence showing that up to 80% of L&D spend fails to change behaviour or improve performance, how can you guarantee that you source the right learning programmes?

With evidence showing that up to 80% of L&D spend fails to change behaviour or improve performance, how can you guarantee that you source the right learning programmes?

White Paper: The Learning Transfer Problem

[fusion_text] When organisations say they have a learning or training problem, it is likely that what they really have is a learning transfer problem. When people learn, they do so by relating new information to something they already know. This explains why teachers and trainers use examples and case studies, and why they so often … Continue reading “White Paper: The Learning Transfer Problem”

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing”, or “Kirkpatrick must go!”

I’m not normally susceptible to conspiracy theories but I do wonder how it came to be that a global training industry that spends in excess of $600 billion a year, invests so much time and energy measuring the wrong things whilst steadfastly ignoring the painful truths that would be evident if we measured the right things. Why aren’t uncomfortable questions being asked? Where are the screaming headlines?

I’m not normally susceptible to conspiracy theories but I do wonder how it came to be that a global training industry that spends in excess of $600 billion a year, invests so much time and energy measuring the wrong things whilst steadfastly ignoring the painful truths that would be evident if we measured the right things. Why aren’t uncomfortable questions being asked? Where are the screaming headlines?

HR Departments and In-sourcing – the new out-sourcing?

Maybe what lies at the nub of the idea of disbanding the HR function is the concept of sense of purpose – not for ourselves, but as judged by other people. It’s not our own answer to ‘what are you here for, exactly?’ that’s the issue, it’s how other people see it: not the purpose we think we serve, but the one that others think we do. Or, more critically, don’t.

Maybe what lies at the nub of the idea of disbanding the HR function is the concept of sense of purpose – not for ourselves, but as judged by other people. It’s not our own answer to ‘what are you here for, exactly?’ that’s the issue, it’s how other people see it: not the purpose we think we serve, but the one that others think we do. Or, more critically, don’t.

… and what are we hoping to achieve? Results.

If results matter, so does strategy. We believe that organisations improve their productivity and performance through their people, and that strategy – or, at least, L&D strategy – is the means by which they do so. If learners are not to forget why they have acquired new learning, if organisations are not going to forego the benefits this learning could deliver, there is something that we need not to do: forget strategy.

If results matter, so does strategy. We believe that organisations improve their productivity and performance through their people, and that strategy – or, at least, L&D strategy – is the means by which they do so. If learners are not to forget why they have acquired new learning, if organisations are not going to forego the benefits this learning could deliver, there is something that we need not to do: forget strategy.

Book Review – Turning Learning into Action: A proven methodology for effective transfer of learning by Emma Weber

Turning Learning into Action by Emma Webber is a welcome addition to a canon that is surprisingly small given that it deals with a problem that each year wastes over $500 billion worldwide. Subtitled “A proven methodology for effective transfer of learning”, it is a book for L&D practitioners rather than academics, but its purpose is the promotion of the author’s proprietary solutions rather than the creation of a community of practice.

Turning Learning into Action by Emma Webber is a welcome addition to a canon that is surprisingly small given that it deals with a problem that each year wastes over $500 billion worldwide. Subtitled “A proven methodology for effective transfer of learning”, it is a book for L&D practitioners rather than academics, but its purpose is the promotion of the author’s proprietary solutions rather than the creation of a community of practice.

Outside the Ivory Tower: workplace learning

Those of us involving in workplace learning and professional development should be more than aware that ‘our’ kind of education has left the Ivory Tower. The classroom is no longer some kind of ‘holy’ place where employees congregate – no pun intended – to have learning bestowed upon them. The future of organisational learning will be WISE – Workplace, Informal, Social and Experiential – even if it might take a while for the actual individuals to merit the adjective.

Those of us involving in workplace learning and professional development should be more than aware that ‘our’ kind of education has left the Ivory Tower. The classroom is no longer some kind of ‘holy’ place where employees congregate – no pun intended – to have learning bestowed upon them. The future of organisational learning will be WISE – Workplace, Informal, Social and Experiential – even if it might take a while for the actual individuals to merit the adjective.

A Little Knowledge is a Dangerous Thing

The areas in which CEOs felt most informed were also those that are typically the easiest to quantity – Labour Costs being first and foremost amongst them. We appreciate that a knowledge and understanding of the bottom line is an essential, but we also can’t help but think that an understanding of the (human) resources that both drive and enable it is important too.

The areas in which CEOs felt most informed were also those that are typically the easiest to quantity – Labour Costs being first and foremost amongst them. We appreciate that a knowledge and understanding of the bottom line is an essential, but we also can’t help but think that an understanding of the (human) resources that both drive and enable it is important too.