Envy and sabotage

Someone who begrudges the success of others can filter that attitude out like a cloud of pollution; what culture does your workplace hold?

Someone who begrudges the success of others can filter that attitude out like a cloud of pollution; what culture does your workplace hold?

To succeed as a manager you need to encourage failure

When Shizuka Arakawa won the figure skating gold medal in the 2006 Olympic Games, her error free performance marked an achievement beyond the purely personal. The second oldest women to win a figure skating gold medal, she was also the first Asian women to do so. And she quite literally put something behind her on … Continue reading “To succeed as a manager you need to encourage failure”

Creating innovation: be the leader they want and need you to be

[This blog post first appeared in the blog of the World of Learning Conference and Exhibition 2016: further details of this event appear at the end of this posting.] Audiences for leadership advice and guidance have a surprising appetite for simplicity. Despite ample evidence that workplaces, organisations and even that near meaningless phrase, ‘life in … Continue reading “Creating innovation: be the leader they want and need you to be”

What We Talk About When We Talk About Creative Environments

Our professional environment is changing from one with an algorithmic task-based focus to one that both requires and values agile and heuristic thinking: innovative market disruption is driving the need for a more creative mindset from employees. The challenge for organisations, and for their leaders and managers, is how to create and maintain workplace environments … Continue reading “What We Talk About When We Talk About Creative Environments”

Change and the consequences of fear

If we are dealing with people whose response may be effectively summarised as ‘once bitten, twice shy’, how can we help them be either less expecting that another bite is coming or more willing to face the potential risk more optimistically and more resiliently?

If we are dealing with people whose response may be effectively summarised as ‘once bitten, twice shy’, how can we help them be either less expecting that another bite is coming or more willing to face the potential risk more optimistically and more resiliently?