Leadership is dead!

It was Ghandi who said “I suppose at one time, leadership meant muscles, but today it means getting along with people” – Leadership has changed!

It was Ghandi who said “I suppose at one time, leadership meant muscles, but today it means getting along with people” – Leadership has changed!

Are you really making a difference with your L&D?

With evidence showing that up to 80% of L&D spend fails to change behaviour or improve performance, how can you guarantee that you source the right learning programmes?

With evidence showing that up to 80% of L&D spend fails to change behaviour or improve performance, how can you guarantee that you source the right learning programmes?

Personalised learning is vital

If personalised learning is so vital, why aren’t more organisations doing it?   According to the 2017 L&D Global Sentiment Survey, 77% of learning professionals believe the hot topic for organisational learning this year will be personalised learning and adaptive training delivery.   So why aren’t more of us doing it? In reality, providing someone … Continue reading “Personalised learning is vital”

Have you reached a professional plateau?

As young, inexperienced dreamers entering the big wide world of employment, we all entertained grand ideas, passions, and fantasies of enormous success, fame or acclaim. We have finished our schooling, perhaps further education, we’ve answered all the ‘what career to follow’ questionnaires and picked a direction, setting out in the safe knowledge that we will … Continue reading “Have you reached a professional plateau?”

Why measure management effectiveness?

[fusion_text] Because it matters, of course. You’re probably familiar with a business management cliché first uttered by Peter Drucker – ‘What gets measured gets managed’ – but how to measure? The question of management effectiveness becomes more burning when you consider it in the contact of training: while a basic question – “Was is worth … Continue reading “Why measure management effectiveness?”

Is Myers-Briggs up to the job?

[fusion_text] An article published recently in the Financial Times posed the question of the relevance of the Myers-Briggs psychometrics for the modern workplace, and under the same heading we would like to explore what was said, and our own take on the topic. Most people who have worked in a corporate environment or pursued high level academic studies … Continue reading “Is Myers-Briggs up to the job?”

Guiding Principles for OD Consulting

Like any professional consultants (whether that consultancy is provided internally or – even more so – externally), the privilege of being selected to provided our service carries responsibilities. Some are mandatory in the strictest sense – the legal framework defines a range of liabilities and risks – while others are better categorised as ‘professional’ or ‘ethical’. To maintain our standards (and the standards of professional bodes to which we belong, as we are proud to support organisations that work to define, maintain and drive up standards), we are committed to regular and ongoing professional development. A further ethical concern is to recognise the boundaries within which consultancy is provided and presented: the opportunity to present ideas does not translate into a right to see them implemented. (Indeed, insisting too adamantly ultimately undermines the recipient client: effective consultancy should be based on mutual professional respect.) As world leaders in promoting the criticality of ensuring the successful transfer and application of learning, coaching and OD interventions, we are seeking here to identify and encourage the achievement of best practice in this business critical area.

Like any professional consultants (whether that consultancy is provided internally or – even more so – externally), the privilege of being selected to provided our service carries responsibilities. Some are mandatory in the strictest sense – the legal framework defines a range of liabilities and risks – while others are better categorised as ‘professional’ or ‘ethical’. To maintain our standards (and the standards of professional bodes to which we belong, as we are proud to support organisations that work to define, maintain and drive up standards), we are committed to regular and ongoing professional development. A further ethical concern is to recognise the boundaries within which consultancy is provided and presented: the opportunity to present ideas does not translate into a right to see them implemented. (Indeed, insisting too adamantly ultimately undermines the recipient client: effective consultancy should be based on mutual professional respect.) As world leaders in promoting the criticality of ensuring the successful transfer and application of learning, coaching and OD interventions, we are seeking here to identify and encourage the achievement of best practice in this business critical area.

Receiving feedback: taking it on-board, not taking it on the chin

Where feedback is concerned, there is a shared responsibility that underpins the efforts of both giver and receiver: the genuine intention to support the future creation of better work. Giving it is a responsibility to be wielded with intelligence, and receiving it opens up options and avenues that may previously have been closed to us.

Where feedback is concerned, there is a shared responsibility that underpins the efforts of both giver and receiver: the genuine intention to support the future creation of better work. Giving it is a responsibility to be wielded with intelligence, and receiving it opens up options and avenues that may previously have been closed to us.