Is Myers-Briggs up to the job?

[fusion_text] An article published recently in the Financial Times posed the question of the relevance of the Myers-Briggs psychometrics for the modern workplace, and under the same heading we would like to explore what was said, and our own take on the topic. Most people who have worked in a corporate environment or pursued high level academic studies … Continue reading “Is Myers-Briggs up to the job?”

Flowers? Really, you shouldn’t have …

Psychometric tools can – used appropriately – help to answer questions that explore a candidate’s capabilities in these and many other areas, but a willingness to identify the right questions needs to precede the process of unearthing the answers.

Psychometric tools can – used appropriately – help to answer questions that explore a candidate’s capabilities in these and many other areas, but a willingness to identify the right questions needs to precede the process of unearthing the answers.

In the Psychometrist’s Chair, Episode 4: Hogan MVPI Instrument

For regular readers whose medium-term memory has not been erased by the imperatives of haste, you may remember that our account of the experience and value of completing four of the most commonly used psychometric instruments has so far been incomplete. (If you’re new here, or would value a memory-jogger, there are previous articles about MBTI, FIRO-B and the Hogan Development Survey.) Having been delayed by the need to respond to urgent priorities – in which I suspect there is another valuable life lesson – this time we look at the Hogan Motives, Values, Preferences Inventory (MVPI).

For regular readers whose medium-term memory has not been erased by the imperatives of haste, you may remember that our account of the experience and value of completing four of the most commonly used psychometric instruments has so far been incomplete. (If you’re new here, or would value a memory-jogger, there are previous articles about MBTI, FIRO-B and the Hogan Development Survey.) Having been delayed by the need to respond to urgent priorities – in which I suspect there is another valuable life lesson – this time we look at the Hogan Motives, Values, Preferences Inventory (MVPI).

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

Understand what a psychometric is meant to do before you use it and don’t assume that one will work in all situations. In the same way that you would go to your doctor or chemist to know what medication to take for your ailments, you should see expert advice from practitioners who know the different tools and how they should be used properly.

Understand what a psychometric is meant to do before you use it and don’t assume that one will work in all situations. In the same way that you would go to your doctor or chemist to know what medication to take for your ailments, you should see expert advice from practitioners who know the different tools and how they should be used properly.

In the Psychometrist’s Chair: Episode 3 – The Hogan Development Survey

There are probably some fairly bad taste jokes to be cracked in the context of psychometrics about ‘not knowing your own strength’, and I’ll try to avoid them. But as psychometric instruments go, the Hogan Development Survey is different in identifying those strengths that can, indulged to excess, undermine us. Sometimes referred to as ‘The Dark Side’ rather than ‘The Development Survey’, it will help to keep in mind that the reference is to the less desirable aspects of our personality that may escape our ability to control or conceal them when we are living or acting under pressure.

There are probably some fairly bad taste jokes to be cracked in the context of psychometrics about ‘not knowing your own strength’, and I’ll try to avoid them. But as psychometric instruments go, the Hogan Development Survey is different in identifying those strengths that can, indulged to excess, undermine us. Sometimes referred to as ‘The Dark Side’ rather than ‘The Development Survey’, it will help to keep in mind that the reference is to the less desirable aspects of our personality that may escape our ability to control or conceal them when we are living or acting under pressure.

In the Psychometrist’s Chair: Episode 2 – FIRO-B

In the previous episode in this series, I related the experience of completing the MBTI questionnaire and receiving facilitated feedback. But if MBTI is mostly about the individual, giving feedback on relationships with others more by inference and implication, FIRO-B is explicitly about the individual, others and the relationship(s) between the two. This is an instrument that looks at the ways we wish to behave towards others and others to behave towards us, and illuminates that these may be very different even in a single dimension: FIRO-B can illuminate many things, not least that “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” may be a familiar expression but it can also be highly inaccurate in describing our behavioural patterns.

In the previous episode in this series, I related the experience of completing the MBTI questionnaire and receiving facilitated feedback. But if MBTI is mostly about the individual, giving feedback on relationships with others more by inference and implication, FIRO-B is explicitly about the individual, others and the relationship(s) between the two. This is an instrument that looks at the ways we wish to behave towards others and others to behave towards us, and illuminates that these may be very different even in a single dimension: FIRO-B can illuminate many things, not least that “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” may be a familiar expression but it can also be highly inaccurate in describing our behavioural patterns.

In the Psychometrist’s Chair: Episode 1 – MBTI

There are many different psychometric instruments in use, not just in leadership or management development, but also in the recruitment and personal development fields and others. As it occurred to me that very rarely do you get to read a first-hand account of the process of completing some of these questionnaires and receiving feedback on them, I took the opportunity to follow up a fascinating session by an ASK colleague during Adult Learning Week by completing a range of the most commonly used tools and receiving facilitated feedback on them. In this first post in a series, I’ll cover MBTI® (later posts will cover FIRO-B® and instruments from the Hogan stable), and I hope they will provide not just interesting reading, but an insight into the psychometric experience for those who have yet to undergo it or are apprehensive about doing so.

There are many different psychometric instruments in use, not just in leadership or management development, but also in the recruitment and personal development fields and others. As it occurred to me that very rarely do you get to read a first-hand account of the process of completing some of these questionnaires and receiving feedback on them, I took the opportunity to follow up a fascinating session by an ASK colleague during Adult Learning Week by completing a range of the most commonly used tools and receiving facilitated feedback on them. In this first post in a series, I’ll cover MBTI® (later posts will cover FIRO-B® and instruments from the Hogan stable), and I hope they will provide not just interesting reading, but an insight into the psychometric experience for those who have yet to undergo it or are apprehensive about doing so.