Learning evolution

How we learn is changing – and how we teach must change too Formal learning has always had – and will always have – a place in L&D, and we will always support the formal learning programmes our clients request. But we also know that people learn in different ways, and that our approach has … Continue reading “Learning evolution”

White Paper: The Learning Transfer Problem

[fusion_text] When organisations say they have a learning or training problem, it is likely that what they really have is a learning transfer problem. When people learn, they do so by relating new information to something they already know. This explains why teachers and trainers use examples and case studies, and why they so often … Continue reading “White Paper: The Learning Transfer Problem”

Flexible working – the good and the bad

[fusion_text] When we ask what people desire in their careers there can be a long list of things they name – but one word that crops up time and time again is flexibility. But when that can be interpreted so many different ways – and by so many different people who influence your career – … Continue reading “Flexible working – the good and the bad”

Engagement Takes Two: Line Managers and Learning Transfer

[fusion_text] Whether or not we really are our own worst enemy as a species, human nature frequently defeats possibilities of human success. When we consider our efforts in learning transfer, there is, for example, human laziness and our willingness to settle for less than might have been achievable. The assumption that learners might see training … Continue reading “Engagement Takes Two: Line Managers and Learning Transfer”

HR Departments and In-sourcing – the new out-sourcing?

Maybe what lies at the nub of the idea of disbanding the HR function is the concept of sense of purpose – not for ourselves, but as judged by other people. It’s not our own answer to ‘what are you here for, exactly?’ that’s the issue, it’s how other people see it: not the purpose we think we serve, but the one that others think we do. Or, more critically, don’t.

Maybe what lies at the nub of the idea of disbanding the HR function is the concept of sense of purpose – not for ourselves, but as judged by other people. It’s not our own answer to ‘what are you here for, exactly?’ that’s the issue, it’s how other people see it: not the purpose we think we serve, but the one that others think we do. Or, more critically, don’t.

… and what are we hoping to achieve? Results.

If results matter, so does strategy. We believe that organisations improve their productivity and performance through their people, and that strategy – or, at least, L&D strategy – is the means by which they do so. If learners are not to forget why they have acquired new learning, if organisations are not going to forego the benefits this learning could deliver, there is something that we need not to do: forget strategy.

If results matter, so does strategy. We believe that organisations improve their productivity and performance through their people, and that strategy – or, at least, L&D strategy – is the means by which they do so. If learners are not to forget why they have acquired new learning, if organisations are not going to forego the benefits this learning could deliver, there is something that we need not to do: forget strategy.

Book Review – Turning Learning into Action: A proven methodology for effective transfer of learning by Emma Weber

Turning Learning into Action by Emma Webber is a welcome addition to a canon that is surprisingly small given that it deals with a problem that each year wastes over $500 billion worldwide. Subtitled “A proven methodology for effective transfer of learning”, it is a book for L&D practitioners rather than academics, but its purpose is the promotion of the author’s proprietary solutions rather than the creation of a community of practice.

Turning Learning into Action by Emma Webber is a welcome addition to a canon that is surprisingly small given that it deals with a problem that each year wastes over $500 billion worldwide. Subtitled “A proven methodology for effective transfer of learning”, it is a book for L&D practitioners rather than academics, but its purpose is the promotion of the author’s proprietary solutions rather than the creation of a community of practice.

Outside the Ivory Tower: workplace learning

Those of us involving in workplace learning and professional development should be more than aware that ‘our’ kind of education has left the Ivory Tower. The classroom is no longer some kind of ‘holy’ place where employees congregate – no pun intended – to have learning bestowed upon them. The future of organisational learning will be WISE – Workplace, Informal, Social and Experiential – even if it might take a while for the actual individuals to merit the adjective.

Those of us involving in workplace learning and professional development should be more than aware that ‘our’ kind of education has left the Ivory Tower. The classroom is no longer some kind of ‘holy’ place where employees congregate – no pun intended – to have learning bestowed upon them. The future of organisational learning will be WISE – Workplace, Informal, Social and Experiential – even if it might take a while for the actual individuals to merit the adjective.