Why Can’t We Talk?

[fusion_text] Communication matters. Organisations are networks of relationships – individuals interacting in pursuit of hopefully shared goals, aims or objectives. Even departments of one must interact with others to be able to clearly identify what others require – or what they require from others – and how best this can be achieved. No desk is … Continue reading “Why Can’t We Talk?”

Why measure management effectiveness?

[fusion_text] Because it matters, of course. You’re probably familiar with a business management cliché first uttered by Peter Drucker – ‘What gets measured gets managed’ – but how to measure? The question of management effectiveness becomes more burning when you consider it in the contact of training: while a basic question – “Was is worth … Continue reading “Why measure management effectiveness?”

“Senior business leaders unequipped to manage and develop people”

[fusion_text] Those blunt words were how the CIPD announced the findings of its HR Outlook: Winter 2016-17 survey.  While organisations voted performance management and people management as the two most important behaviours and skills for organisations over the next three years, senior leaders’ current performance in these areas were considered ineffective by 53% of respondents … Continue reading ““Senior business leaders unequipped to manage and develop people””

Let your stars shine!

Inspire your staff and let their skills shine! John Lewis spend millions every year creating their highly anticipated Christmas adverts. But this year, before the official advert was released, A-Level student Nick Jablonka posted a video he created for his coursework, fooling many into believing it was the real thing. With limited time and formal … Continue reading “Let your stars shine!”

Listening Skills: we welcome your input …

There is a basic equation at work that seems to extend beyond relative status or authority: keep paying lip service to others and they will eventually stop paying ear service to you.

There is a basic equation at work that seems to extend beyond relative status or authority: keep paying lip service to others and they will eventually stop paying ear service to you.

Book Review – Becoming a Better Boss: Why Good Management is Most Difficult by Julian Birkenshaw

This book was picked by CIPD’s People Management magazine as one of their recommended top five stocking fillers for Christmas 2013 and, as you can see from the date of this review, it has taken me almost exactly three months to read it. Thankfully, it wasn’t a Christmas gift from a family member. The first question … Continue reading “Book Review – Becoming a Better Boss: Why Good Management is Most Difficult by Julian Birkenshaw”

What makes the grunts disgruntled? Distrust.

One of the long-standing conundrums of life in the workplace is the gap that exists between managers’ perceptions and those of their employees. Some middle-managers also find themselves having to act as buffers between a ‘bad boss’ and the staff who report to them. Middle-managers may not be natural born tailwaggers, but they do share something with puppies: treat them badly for long enough and they’ll stop loving or respecting you.

One of the long-standing conundrums of life in the workplace is the gap that exists between managers’ perceptions and those of their employees. Some middle-managers also find themselves having to act as buffers between a ‘bad boss’ and the staff who report to them. Middle-managers may not be natural born tailwaggers, but they do share something with puppies: treat them badly for long enough and they’ll stop loving or respecting you.

Happiness at Work: “If you’re happy and you know it, you’re unusual”

Those of us who will spend Monday morning as CEOs, data analysts or HR advisors might want to spend Sunday evening reflecting that the exact nature of this collision between other’s people’s aspirations and realities lies within their power to influence. We’re not in favour of upsetting work-life balance, but we hope that everyone spends their Sunday evenings wisely.

Those of us who will spend Monday morning as CEOs, data analysts or HR advisors might want to spend Sunday evening reflecting that the exact nature of this collision between other’s people’s aspirations and realities lies within their power to influence. We’re not in favour of upsetting work-life balance, but we hope that everyone spends their Sunday evenings wisely.

The HR Profession: when you become the story …

As Louisa Peacock’s article pointed out, HR has long had a reputation for hand-wringing and wondering when it will ever be front page news. Today, that moment arrived and I think we can safely say it didn’t run as planned. HR, as a profession, has come out of this as badly as the BBC, and HR didn’t have that long-running groundswell of public support on which to fall back, and to leverage for its reputational recovery. The Yahoo-hosted copy of the Telegraph article has accumulated 1099 comments in just over 24 hours. Let’s just say that most of them may take a little spinning.

As Louisa Peacock’s article pointed out, HR has long had a reputation for hand-wringing and wondering when it will ever be front page news. Today, that moment arrived and I think we can safely say it didn’t run as planned. HR, as a profession, has come out of this as badly as the BBC, and HR didn’t have that long-running groundswell of public support on which to fall back, and to leverage for its reputational recovery. The Yahoo-hosted copy of the Telegraph article has accumulated 1099 comments in just over 24 hours. Let’s just say that most of them may take a little spinning.

Two Way Monologues

I can see quite clearly how employees’ opinion – especially where it’s expressed confidentially to a third party – of the quality of management they receive could differ from the managers’ opinions, but the figures above suggest that the two groups have sharply different opinions about how often they meet and for how long. The survey goes on to show that they are no greater agreement about the topics they discuss when they do meet. So how come 33% of employees don’t notice the weekly meetings they have with their manager, and even the ones who do think these meetings take place seem to think they are considerably shorter than their managers are reporting?

I can see quite clearly how employees’ opinion – especially where it’s expressed confidentially to a third party – of the quality of management they receive could differ from the managers’ opinions, but the figures above suggest that the two groups have sharply different opinions about how often they meet and for how long. The survey goes on to show that they are no greater agreement about the topics they discuss when they do meet. So how come 33% of employees don’t notice the weekly meetings they have with their manager, and even the ones who do think these meetings take place seem to think they are considerably shorter than their managers are reporting?