A long but broken engagement?

Back in April 2010, we wrote about the MacLeod Review, a government review into the complex and timely issue of employee engagement. Judging by the frequency with which we read about the topic in the HR/L&D press – and are even requested to comment or write for the same media outlets ourselves – it is not in that category of organisational issues that we can mark down as essentially a fad. On the contrary, engagement is the issue that will not go away. But are organisations listening to the sources that provide evidence of the need to make changes (or even the benefits of doing so)? The verdict is less clear.

Back in April 2010, we wrote about the MacLeod Review, a government review into the complex and timely issue of employee engagement. Judging by the frequency with which we read about the topic in the HR/L&D press – and are even requested to comment or write for the same media outlets ourselves – it is not in that category of organisational issues that we can mark down as essentially a fad. On the contrary, engagement is the issue that will not go away. But are organisations listening to the sources that provide evidence of the need to make changes (or even the benefits of doing so)? The verdict is less clear.

A Little Knowledge is a Dangerous Thing

The areas in which CEOs felt most informed were also those that are typically the easiest to quantity – Labour Costs being first and foremost amongst them. We appreciate that a knowledge and understanding of the bottom line is an essential, but we also can’t help but think that an understanding of the (human) resources that both drive and enable it is important too.

The areas in which CEOs felt most informed were also those that are typically the easiest to quantity – Labour Costs being first and foremost amongst them. We appreciate that a knowledge and understanding of the bottom line is an essential, but we also can’t help but think that an understanding of the (human) resources that both drive and enable it is important too.

Fitter, happier, more productive?

If we’re going to really address wellbeing in its proper sense(s), do we shrug and decide it’s really up to the individual? Open the brochure drawer and leave it up to them whether they read it or not? Or do we open our ears, eyes and mouths and see wellbeing as a mutual responsibility? As something that we can not only all contribute to, but all gain from in return?

If we’re going to really address wellbeing in its proper sense(s), do we shrug and decide it’s really up to the individual? Open the brochure drawer and leave it up to them whether they read it or not? Or do we open our ears, eyes and mouths and see wellbeing as a mutual responsibility? As something that we can not only all contribute to, but all gain from in return?