Receiving feedback: taking it on-board, not taking it on the chin

Where feedback is concerned, there is a shared responsibility that underpins the efforts of both giver and receiver: the genuine intention to support the future creation of better work. Giving it is a responsibility to be wielded with intelligence, and receiving it opens up options and avenues that may previously have been closed to us.

Where feedback is concerned, there is a shared responsibility that underpins the efforts of both giver and receiver: the genuine intention to support the future creation of better work. Giving it is a responsibility to be wielded with intelligence, and receiving it opens up options and avenues that may previously have been closed to us.

Great performance can pass unnoticed

In our workplaces, we are – for better and for worse – less likely to pass unnoticed. Unlike buskers, we perform to job descriptions and against performance targets, completing timesheets and being monitored and tracked by any number of both people and systems. If a busker has a bad morning, that’s their problem and the issue ends there.

In our workplaces, we are – for better and for worse – less likely to pass unnoticed. Unlike buskers, we perform to job descriptions and against performance targets, completing timesheets and being monitored and tracked by any number of both people and systems. If a busker has a bad morning, that’s their problem and the issue ends there.

The power of narrative: great story, but who’s speaking?

I’ll be neither the first person nor the last to point out the role of storytelling in our working lives. Most of us are, without wishing to sound unkind, suckers for a great narrative: a plotline that has us gripped, wanting adversity to be overcome and for the beleaguered hero’s true worth to be finally … Continue reading “The power of narrative: great story, but who’s speaking?”

Interview feedback: “In five years time?”

It’s one of the classic HR/interview questions, isn’t it? Where you see yourself in some hypothetical future state, having mysteriously gained awesome prophetic powers that enable you to accurately foresee not just your own career trajectory, but the future health of the interviewing company, the economy in general, your personal life circumstances – and presumably that bus you step out of the way of just in time sometime in 2017.

It’s one of the classic HR/interview questions, isn’t it? Where you see yourself in some hypothetical future state, having mysteriously gained awesome prophetic powers that enable you to accurately foresee not just your own career trajectory, but the future health of the interviewing company, the economy in general, your personal life circumstances – and presumably that bus you step out of the way of just in time sometime in 2017.