Peak trust: is it ahead, or is it behind us?

[fusion_text] In findings that may dampen spirits in the C-Suites of the kingdom (and more than a few republics), CEOs are – with the exception of media spokespeople – currently the least trusted sources of information, according to the 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer. As Management Today reported: “Trust in businesses and business leaders is on … Continue reading “Peak trust: is it ahead, or is it behind us?”

Bending into the wind: staying agile in 2017

[fusion_text] How can you stay agile and lead a business when it feels like things are falling apart? As 2016 rolled to a close, many of us heaved a sigh of relief, looking forward to a new year that offered hope of better things after a tumultuous twelve months. But as you look ahead, have … Continue reading “Bending into the wind: staying agile in 2017”

Jack be nimble: learning to be an agile leader

[fusion_text] Leadership may not be our oldest discipline, but it has been around long enough to raise quite a herd of sacred cows. Around the world, companies have invested huge amounts of time – and other, harder currencies – in developing hierarchical organisational structures, writing procedural manuals, designing (and, where that doesn’t sound grand enough, … Continue reading “Jack be nimble: learning to be an agile leader”

The power of emotional agility

You are probably already familiar with Emotional Intelligence (usually abbreviated as EQ): a measure of your ability to identify your own emotions and those of others, and to manage them. As measurements go, however, it is relatively static: an assessment of scope more than of speed and practice. Emotional Agility is subtly but importantly different: … Continue reading “The power of emotional agility”

Storytelling may not be the whole story

Though many would blame the advertising industry, responsibility for one of the biggest recent trends in the business world undoubtedly dates back thousands of years, to campfires and tribal gatherings. We are, of course, referring to storytelling. Human beings have such a strong taste for the narrative arcs of conflict, tension and resolution that even … Continue reading “Storytelling may not be the whole story”

Red lines or blurred lines: risk taking and decision making

To make a change is to take a risk. When we cannot predict the future, how it can be otherwise? All our choices and decisions have an element of risk, which we claim to feel encouraged to minimise or see ourselves as adverse. Despite this, we continue to produce evidence to the contrary. Every year, … Continue reading “Red lines or blurred lines: risk taking and decision making”

Switching off, or just mulling things over?

Worrying constantly and without pause at a problem does not guarantee any greater likelihood of solving it, as human capacity for conscious thinking is both limited and relatively easily exhausted. Our unconscious thinking capacity, however, is far greater, and we tend to underestimate the power of our unconscious memory.

Worrying constantly and without pause at a problem does not guarantee any greater likelihood of solving it, as human capacity for conscious thinking is both limited and relatively easily exhausted. Our unconscious thinking capacity, however, is far greater, and we tend to underestimate the power of our unconscious memory.

Figures and FOG: Laura Rittenhouse on Candour

Rittenhouse’s charts and blog posts, tracking the candor analysis rankings of top companies against their performance, makes for interesting reading and is often persuasive. It’s also interesting to see recent moves in the rankings: Google are plummeting in recent times, while 3M are travelling in a more positive direction. And yet, and yet …

Rittenhouse’s charts and blog posts, tracking the candor analysis rankings of top companies against their performance, makes for interesting reading and is often persuasive. It’s also interesting to see recent moves in the rankings: Google are plummeting in recent times, while 3M are travelling in a more positive direction. And yet, and yet …

The tempo of busyness: slow, slow, quick-quick, slow …

In a society that doing otherwise is effectively daring to signal that we’re dispensable, how should we respond. Certainly it was hard to avoid the feeling that Steve, a self-employed man looking to parlay a commitment to festival organisation into an events management business, had chosen to be busy as often as possible. It’s also telling that the most shocking sentence uttered was his statement that you shouldn’t “allow the outside world to demand 100% of you”. Giving 95% is our era’s equivalent of blasphemy.

In a society that doing otherwise is effectively daring to signal that we’re dispensable, how should we respond. Certainly it was hard to avoid the feeling that Steve, a self-employed man looking to parlay a commitment to festival organisation into an events management business, had chosen to be busy as often as possible. It’s also telling that the most shocking sentence uttered was his statement that you shouldn’t “allow the outside world to demand 100% of you”. Giving 95% is our era’s equivalent of blasphemy.

Authenticity: if you can fake that …

Surely I’m not the only one who has noticed the steady rise of ‘fake’ as an insult. If you’ve ever watched Big Brother – in itself, a social experiment that has morphed into light entertainment – you’ve probably noticed that this single adjective now encompasses every variety of dislike, including just genuinely disliking someone: in the show’s context, it truly has become the four-letter f-word. Inauthenticity is the most deadly slur that one candidate can utter against another, even while speaking in the context of a competitive game show based in large part around the social popularity of those taking part.

Surely I’m not the only one who has noticed the steady rise of ‘fake’ as an insult. If you’ve ever watched Big Brother – in itself, a social experiment that has morphed into light entertainment – you’ve probably noticed that this single adjective now encompasses every variety of dislike, including just genuinely disliking someone: in the show’s context, it truly has become the four-letter f-word. Inauthenticity is the most deadly slur that one candidate can utter against another, even while speaking in the context of a competitive game show based in large part around the social popularity of those taking part.